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Subject:Which SLR
Time:01:38 pm
I'm vaguely thinking about upgrading my SLR, currently a Nikon D50, and possibly going over to Canon, because there seems to be more reasonably priced Canon gear around and because it's easier to test older lenses on Canon than on Nikon - the adopters are simpler and cheaper because the camera body is shallower. Another factor is that the lens I use most is designed for the older Nikon autofocus bodies with a motor in the body and is incompatible with most recent bodies, so I'd need to change it if I got a newer camera - if I do this I might as well go the whole hog.

My needs, basically, are a body with reasonable resolution - say 10 megapixel or better - and a macro zoom covering say 28-200 or 300mm (my current one is 28-300) plus a smaller zoom (say 15-55mm) for family stuff where I don't want to lug around s big lens. Digital preview would be nice but I don't want to pay huge amounts for it. I'd be looking to buy 2nd hand so reliability would be a plus.

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thorkell
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Time:2016-09-26 11:56 pm (UTC)
If you want to stay in Nikon and get a new-from-the-box camera I think the cheapest on with a focus motor in the body is the D7200, I guess you can get a slightly used D7000 or D7100.

All Canon EOS cameras have focus motors in the body. I'd take a look at the EOS 750D or 760D, they're both the most recent cameras in that line there is some minor technical difference between them but I can't recall what it is.

You could also look at the EOS M line. Canon just announced the EOS M5, I don't think it has hit the shops yet but you could take a look at the M3 (which confusingly is the model the M5 is supposed to replace). The EOS M line cameras are mirrorless so they're smaller than the EOS line. They also have a different lens mount (called an EF-M mount), but you can get an adapter so you can fit EF lenses (Canon's regular lens mount is called EF).

Both Canon and Nikon make decent 18-55 lenses, so you ought to be good whichever brand you go for. I'm not familiar with lenses with such a long zoom as the 28-300 or similar so I can't offer advice there.
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ffutures
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Time:2016-09-27 08:40 am (UTC)
D7000/7100 is certainly a possibility, I'll have to take a look at them.

Are you sure Canon have motors in the body? I'm pretty sure they have motors in the lenses like later Nikon lenses. It doesn't actually matter, since I'd have to buy a new lens if I went that route, but I might as well get it right.

In general, I'm looking for affordable rather than state of the art, so I won't be going for brand new stuff or really high resolutions.
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thorkell
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Time:2016-09-27 10:01 am (UTC)
I goofed on saying Canons have the motor in the body. All Canon lenses have a focus motor in them.

You are going to have no problem getting at least 10 megapixels, I think none of the commonly available DSLRs now have less than that.
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d_floorlandmine
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Time:2016-09-27 08:28 pm (UTC)
There are some Canon lenses for the EOS range that only fit on the bodies with the smaller APS-C sensor (the big mirrors clip them, I believe). So while the standard EF lenses fit all EOS cameras, the EF-S lenses only fit on the compact sensor DSLRs.

(I still use an old Canon EOS-400D as my primary body - does the job for me, and is just over 10.1MP - I've been using it for quite a few years now.)
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