Marcus L. Rowland (ffutures) wrote,
Marcus L. Rowland
ffutures

Calling all rules lawyers!

Those of you who have been following the "rewriting the rules" thingy I posted on Tuesday will know that heliograph has made a very good suggestion, that I replace the rather clunky lookup table for skill and characteristic use with a rule that requires some VERY simple mental arithmatic.

Here's a first pass at the section that explains how it works, with a couple of examples. What I want is for the rules lawyers amongst us - yes, I know you're out there - to read this and let me know if you can suggest any revision to the wording, or spot any ambiguity. Thanks!



Using Characteristics

Depending on circumstances, characteristics may be used against other characteristics, against skills, or against an arbitrary "Difficulty". Skills give an edge in most of these situations, as explained in later sections, but it's occasionally necessary to use them directly. For this, and for all other use of characteristics and skills, the following rule is used:

To do anything roll 2D6:
  • Add the characteristic, skill or Difficulty that you want to overcome.
  • Subtract the skill or characteristic you're using.
  • If the modified result is 7 or less you succeed.
  • If the number to be overcome is 8 or less and the UNMODIFIED dice roll is 2 you ALWAYS succeed.
  • A roll of 12 (ignore all modifiers) ALWAYS fails.

Example: Breaking down a door
Fred (BODY [4]) wants to break a household door (BODY [6]). The first attempt is a roll of 7.
  7 + 6 (the door's BODY) - 4 (Fred's BODY) = 9
The kick's a failure, and the door rattles but stays shut.

After a brief rest Fred kicks the door again. On a 2 the lock breaks. The referee dramatises this by describing the wood splintering and the knob flying across the room and shattering a priceless Ming vase.

Example: Arm Wrestling
Fred (BODY [4]) and Nigel (BODY [2]) are arm wrestling. In each round each should roll BODY as attacker with the other character's BODY as defender.

Round 1: Fred and Nigel both roll 10, too high to succeed. Nothing happens, apart from a slight flabby quivering of opposed muscles.

Round 2: Fred and Nigel both roll 3, and succeed. Again, nothing happens apart from more quivering. Since both succeeded this is described in terms of bulging muscles, a clash of titans.

Round 3: Fred rolls 10 and fails, Nigel rolls 2 and succeeds. Nigel smashes Fred's arm to the table and wins the match.



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